Winchester, NH

Originally named Arlington, in honor of Charles Fitzroy, Earl of Arlington, this town was one of those established in 1733 as protection for the Massachusetts border at the Connecticut River. After becoming part of the New Hampshire province in 1741, the town was granted to Colonel Josiah Willard, commander of Fort Dummer. Following the wars, it was incorporated as Winchester, for Charles Paulet, Marquis of Winchester, third Duke of Bolton, and constable of the Tower of London.

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Westmoreland, NH

Once known as Great Meadows, this town was established in 1735 as Number 2 in the line of Connecticut River fort towns designed to protect the colonies from Indian attack. When New Hampshire became an independent province, it was granted to settlers as Westmoreland, named for John Fane, seventh Earl of Westmoreland. The meetinghouse in Westmoreland, built in 1762, has a Paul Revere bell.

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Walpole, NH

Settled as early as 1736 as Great Falls or Lunenburg, this town was not granted by New Hampshire until 1752, when it was named Bellowstown. Colonel Benjamin Bellows, for whom Bellows Falls, Vermont, was named, built a large fort at Walpole for defense against Indian attack. In 1761 the grant was renewed, and the town was renamed Walpole, in honor of Sir Robert Walpole, first Prime Minister of England.

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Troy, NH

Troy was separated from Marlborough in 1815, and included parts of Fitzwilliam, Swanzey, and Richmond. A prominent citizen and friend of Governor John Taylor Gilman, Captain Benjamin Mann of Mason, suggested the name Troy. His daughter Betsy was married to Samuel Wilson, famous as Uncle Sam, and at that time a resident of Troy, New York. At least seven members to Wilson's family were living in the town at the time, thus securing the name.

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Swanzey, NH

First granted in 1733 as Lower Ashuelot, this town was one of the fort towns established by Governor Belcher of Massachusetts. It was chartered in 1753, and named Swanzey at the suggestion of Governor Brenton of Rhode Island. The governor was a large land owner in Brenton's Farm, now Litchfield, and Swansea, Massachusetts, named for Swansea in Wales.

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Surry, NH

Chartered in 1769 from a part of Westmoreland, the town was named for Charles Howard, Earl of Surrey, Duke of Norfolk, and hereditary Earl Marshal of England. The county of Surrey in England was known for manufacture of pleasure carriages called surreys, introduced to America in 1872. Surry is an excellent geological area, containing quantities of quartz bearing veins of gold, silver, copper, and lead.

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Sullivan, NH

Carved out of portions of Gilsum, Stoddard, Nelson, and Keene, this town was named in honor of General John Sullivan, a Revolutionary War hero. General Sullivan served as a member of the Continental Congress, Adjutant General to Washington, and Major General of the Northern Army. He was elected President of New Hampshire in 1786, and the town of Sullivan was created the following year.

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Stoddard, NH

First granted in 1752, this town was originally known as Monadnock Number 7. It briefly held the name Limerick before being incorporated as Stoddard in 1774, in honor of Colonel Sampson Stoddard. Colonel Stoddard was appointed to survey southwestern New Hampshire by the colonial government, receiving several land grants for the service. Between 1840 and 1873, Stoddard was a center of glass manufacturing, home to four glass factories whose products are much prized today.

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Roxbury, NH

Roxbury was once a part of Monadnock Number 5, one of the settlements reserved for soldiers of the French wars. Monadnock Number 5 became Marlborough, and in 1812, a group of citizens successfully petitioned for incorporation as a separate town. It was named Roxbury after their old village, now part of Boston.

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Rindge, NH

Granted to soldiers from Rowley, Massachusetts, returning from the war in Canada, the town was known as Rowley-Canada. In 1749, the town was renamed Monadnock Number 1, or South Monadnock. It was incorporated as Rindge in 1768, in honor of Captain Daniel Rindge, one of the original grant holders. Rindge is the home of Franklin Pierce College, and the Cathedral of the Pines, a multi-denominational outdoor chapel.

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